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How Parents Can Help Children Recover

Mar 18

Written by:
3/18/2015 9:16 AM  RssIcon

New Publication Suite for Parents

To help parents and caregivers of children and youth who have experienced maltreatment–from abuse and neglect to sexual abuse or other trauma – ACF/DHHS Child Welfare Information Gateway has created a series of fact sheets for parents explaining how children are affected by maltreatment and how parents can help children recover.

Parenting a Child Who Has Been Sexually Abused: A Guide for Foster and Adoptive Parents discusses child sexual abuse, behaviors associated with prior sexual abuse, and how sexual abuse affects children's trust of others. The factsheet also discusses how families can establish guidelines so that children and youth feel safe. Resources for seeking help also are included.

Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Abuse or Neglect defines child abuse and neglect, explains the effects of maltreatment, offers tips for how parents can help their children build resiliency and heal, and points to resources for support.


Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma discusses the nature of trauma, especially abuse or neglect, the effects of trauma on children and youth, and ways to help a child who has experienced trauma.


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