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    Therapeutic Foster Care is foster care that provides youth with a higher level of structure and support. TFC provides a combination of hard work and heart work.  Click here to learn more about...

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    There are multiple ways in which you can help a child at SCYAP.  Be a Foster Parent! Be a Youth Advocate! Make a donation to one of our special programs! Click here to learn more about how you...

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    The Traditional Foster Care Program is a collaborative program between SCYAP and the South Carolina (DSS).Click here to learn more about becoming a traditional foster parent.


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    Non-residential services provided face-to-face with youth and families in the home, school or community.  Click here to learn more about SCYAP Community-Based Services.


SCYAP Blog

Welcome to Our Blog
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Stay connected through the SCYAP Blog. Your source for knowledge, support, and guidance for your work with children experiencing emotional and behavioral challenges.
By Donna on 3/14/2018 2:19 PM

Did you know it's National Social Work Month? The 2018 theme for National Social Work Month is "Leaders. Advocates. Champions." Let's focus on the word "Advocates." What exactly does it mean to be an advocate? Advocate, as defined by the Merriam Webster dictionary is one who pleads the cause of another. The definition alone is powerful, but when a person puts advocacy into action, especially for children and youth, that's when lives are impacted and the world can be changed for the better. Check out the full blog for a better understanding of the duties of child advocates and how their work ultimately helps to positively change the course of the future, because children are the future after all. 

By Donna on 2/9/2018 4:25 PM

As you may have heard before, becoming a foster parent is not the easiest process.  Nothing worth having (doing) is easy though, right?  Exactly.  That being said it never hurts to prepare when taking on any role in life and foster parenting is definitely one of those roles that every ounce of preparation is well worthwhile!  The ten steps listed in this blog provide some helpful ideas for how you can prepare for one of the most rewarding roles in your life.

By Donna on 1/3/2018 4:03 PM



While it may already be the third day in 2018, it is never too late to work towards the resolutions you will find in our latest blog.  Foster Parents hold a unique role in a child's life cultivating an influence that can impact the child beyond their time with them and can even positively influence the birth family once reunification takes place.  To learn how you can improve your already impactful role, check out the following seven resolutions and make 2018 your best foster parenting year yet. 
By Donna on 11/6/2017 11:42 AM



There is never a wrong time to teach children and youth about gratitude, but with Thanksgiving quickly approaching, now seems an appropriate time to place more emphasis on one of the greatest life lessons.  For five extremely helpful, simple, and FREE tips read the full version of SCYAP's latest blog.  The tips come from Dr. Monisha Vasa who is a well-respected psychiatrist and a dedicated mother.  Oh, and did we mention these tips are free? 

By Donna on 8/18/2017 12:20 PM

Is it possible that summer is nearly over? It seems to be that way as much as we fight against it. With the days of pool visits and lighter schedules fading away it is now time to start thinking about how to slowly, but surely regain the mindset needed to prep and even be happy about the new school year. Below are a few tips to help in this daunting process.

By Donna on 7/19/2017 1:34 PM



Now that summer is in full force, and the thermostats are full proof of that, check out our latest blog for a list of fun indoor activities.  Keep the kiddos entertained even when going outside isn't the coolest option.

By Donna on 6/13/2017 10:08 AM



Trauma and children: An introduction for foster parents 

It happened suddenly. Sarah and her 10-year-old foster daughter, April, were walking into the grocery store. Out of the blue April shouted, “That’s him!” Sarah looked and saw April staring at a man entering the store just ahead of them. The man, who seemed perfectly ordinary to Sarah, took no notice of them. 

Yet April’s body was rigid with fear. She refused to go any further. In a quavering voice she asked if they could please leave. In the car on the way home she cried quietly to herself, unable to explain what had happened.

It was only later, after she had learned about trauma and its effects, that Sarah understood what went on that day. 

April was having a trauma reaction. 


Article retrieved from https://fosteringperspectives.org/fp_v10n1/trauma.htm.

By Donna on 5/12/2017 2:37 PM

My family has been engaging in foster care for over six years. With each child who has entered our home, we have had new things to learn. We’ve needed to learn about that child’s experience and background so we can parent them from their needs — not simply our expectation. We have learned how to fight for the best outcomes for our foster children and how to support their family.

Each child who enters our home enters as a part of our family — no matter how long they are with us. They are a part of our story, and we are a part of theirs.

Article authored by a licensed foster parent and retrieved from kidhero.chw.org.
By Donna on 4/11/2017 3:11 PM

Some observances are ones you wish you did not have to mark. With some 686,000 children victimized annually by physical, mental, or sexual abuse, National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April is one of those observances.  If there is good news here, it is that reports of child abuse have been declining slightly over recent years.

Article retrieved from www.childtrends.org.

By Donna on 2/8/2017 4:22 PM

Varda Epstein (http://foster-adoptive-kinship-family-services-nj.org/ten-ways-show-foster-child-love/)


If you’re reading this article, it’s likely you’re serving as a foster parent because you’ve got love and warmth to spare. You have something to give. It’s why you’ve opened your home and your heart to a child not your own—a child who has suffered rejection, fear, and loss; a child who feels helpless and abandoned and unprotected. You want, more than anything else, to help this child experience what every child should experience by right: unconditional love, a feeling of belonging, acceptance, hope, and stability. A feeling that he or she is one-of-a-kind in the best possible way.